AskTheChef technique how to make dough

Technique: making dough

Below you can find essential information about the making dough technique.

Technique: making dough

Equipment required:
– mixing bowl
– scales

A dough always starts with flour and water, to which a leavening agent, salt, fat, sugar, eggs, or milk are added. The difference between a dough and a batter is that a dough contains more flour than water, making it solid enough to work with your hands. Mixing these two main ingredients yields a solid mass whose texture changes during the kneading process: it becomes more elastic, for example. The texture comprises basic elements: water, protein (glutens), and starch granules. The texture of dough is always temporary: heat, for example, transforms it instantly.

Every culture has its own traditional breads and pastas, all of which start with a dough. We distinguish between laminated dough, leavened dough, and yeast-leavened laminated dough.

Step-by step laminated dough:

  • Briefly mix the flour, water, egg yolk, salt, and 185g butter into a pre-dough.
  • Roll into a ball and then roll out into a square, working from the centre outwards.
  • Fold the remaining butter (230g) into the dough, as if it were an envelope.
  • Roll the dough out lengthwise and fold into three equal parts, turn by 45 degrees and roll out once again lengthwise. Fold into three equal parts again.
  • Set to cool in the refrigerator for about an hour.
  • Roll out lengthwise once more and fold into three equal parts again.
  • Turn by 45 degrees, roll out lengthwise, and fold into three equal parts again.
  • Set to cool in the refrigerator for about an hour.
  • Once again, roll the dough out lengthwise and fold into three equal parts, turn by 45 degrees, and roll out once again lengthwise. Fold into three equal parts again.
  • Set to cool in the refrigerator for a night or store in the freezer in an air-tight plastic bag. Slowly thaw in the refrigerator.
  • Roll out and use as desired. Every recipe will require a baking temperature of its own, ranging from 180 to 220°C. 

Step-by step leavened dough:

  • Preheat the oven to 220°C.
  • Gently mix together all the ingredients except for the oil to create a smooth dough. Mix in the olive oil at the end of the kneading process.
  • Set the dough to rise under a cloth for 30 minutes at 25°C.
  • Weigh off 450g of the dough and roll into a ball.
  • Set the ball of dough to rise under a cloth for another 30 minutes.
  • Reshape the ball and decorate the dough if desired.
  • Place the dough on a baking sheet or proofing basket and leave to rise for another two hours.
  • Score the dough at the top with a cross and bake for 40 minutes in an oven at 220°C. 

Step-by step yeast-leavened laminated dough:

  • Briefly mix the flour, yeast, water, and egg.
  • Add 50g butter and the salt and knead into a smooth dough.
  • Roll into a neat ball and, working from the centre, roll out into a square.
  • Place a slice of butter weighing 275g onto this square and fold the dough around this.
  • Roll the dough out lengthwise to about 8mm thick and fold into three equal parts.
  • Allow to rest in the refrigerator for at least two hours.
  • Turn the dough by 45 degrees and roll out once again to 8mm. Fold into three equal parts again.
  • Allow to rest in the refrigerator for another two hours
  • Turn the dough by 45 degrees and roll out once again to 8mm. Fold into three equal parts again.
  • Roll out until 3mm thick and cut into triangles.
  • Brush them with a little water and roll them up from the broad side to the point into the typical croissant shape.
  • Place the croissants onto a baking sheet with baking paper and allow to rise for about 90 minutes.
  • Bake at 220°C. The time depends on the size of the croissants.

Can be used for:

  • Enriched doughs: crumbles, shortbread, shortcrust
  • Puff pastries: French method, Dutch method
  • Proofed doughs: bread, sourdough, doughnuts
  • Pasta dough: with egg yolk, without egg yolk
  • Brik pastry
  • Filo pastry
Advertisements

Published by

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.